Flapendectomy

The caps are the only way for pressure to relieve or enter the tanks. The outlets at the top of each tank (shown in the following two photos) are connected to the caps.
Cut out the two flaps (marked with orange X’s)that are next to each other. This will allow the tank to vent equally in both directions. Otherwise the exit pressure has to pass through the squiggly labyrinth shown in InnerCap.jpg
Photo by Goss

These lines terminate just below the bottom of the radiator. No check valve is needed, nor is it desired. The 90’s are plumbed internally to the fuel caps. You will get an occasional dribble of fuel from the lines when run as shown. If that bothers you, just turn the 90’s to point up and run a loop in the vent lines up near the steering head on each side. Don’t go overboard on the routing as you will just add to the posibility of clogged lines. DO NOT ATTACH ONE-WAY VALVES TO THE TANK VENT LINES. These devices have caused the very same problems as the canister by pressurizing the tanks. This has been common knowledge for years now, yet folks continue to install them. Just don’t do it. ‘Nuff said.
Photos by cpmodem

 

The caps need not be removed from the tanks to perform this procedure. They are shown removed in the following images for the purpose of clarity.

The 4 holes in the red cap are the inside tank vents.
Photo by mookymoo

 

Remove the red cap to get to the flaps.
Photo by mookymoo

 

Photo by mookymoo
Photo by mookymoo
Photo by mookymoo
Photo by mookymoo
The “green flappy thing.”
Photo by mookymoo

 

Arrow points to exit hole of vent passages in cap. When the cap is closed, it matches up to the entrance hole in the in the tube that leads to the vent fitting on the top front of the tank.
Photo by mookymoo

 

Clip the two flaps closest to the center of the cap. ie: not the one being clipped above.
Photo by mookymoo
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